Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Tombstone Tuesday: The Grave Of Mary Mitchel Jones

Mary Mitchel Jones
My 3rd great grandmother
Stone reads:  Mary M. wife of Cesar Jones, Born Jan. 21, 1823, died Feb. 22, 1900.
I have fought a good fight. I have finished my course. I have kept the faith.
Bayview Cemetery, Morehead City, NC


Psst! Guess who's will I found recently. Look for it in an upcoming post.

Monday, April 29, 2013

The Atlantic Hotel In Morehead City

Postcard of the Atlantic Hotel in Morehead City, N.C., sitting right on the water. Date
1909. Image courtesy of the Digital Collections, Eastern North Carolina Postcard Collection

"Atlantic Hotel, Morehead City, NC." Photograph taken by Bayard Wooten, ca. 1905-1915
Image courtesy of  Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards (P077), North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hil


The building of the Atlantic Hotel in Morehead City in 1880 had an incredible impact on the city's economy.  The area became known as the "The Summer Capital by the Sea." and created many jobs and opportunities for those who lived nearby. One of my Jones ancestors may have worked at the Atlantic Hotel. For certain, I know that the husband of my 2nd great grand aunt was affiliated with the establishment. 

Here are my Jones ancestors listed in the 1880 census for Morehead City. 


Image courtesy of Ancestry.com: Source Information:  Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. 

My 3rd great grandfather Cesar Jones was a farmer in 1880 while his wife Mary worked in the home.  His children, William Henry, Lizzie (Elizabeth), and a nephew, John Carter, were listed as laborers, perhaps working on Cesar's farm. In the next household, resided Violet Jones Devaughn, my 2nd great grand aunt, who's occupation reads "cook in hotel." Could this have been the Atlantic Hotel?"

My 2nd great grandmother, Jonas Bryant, had a sister named Sidney. Sidney Bryant married a man by the name of Mott Hester. Now this part makes my husband chuckle. The reason why is that he can't believe how often I have come across information regarding some of my ancestors in books or articles.  I can't believe it either sometimes. A couple of years back I ordered a lovely book written by Virginia Pou Doughton called, "Tales of the Atlantic Hotel 1880--1933." It is a fabulous resource that tells year by year what it was like to reside at the hotel. There's tales about the guests who stayed there as well as stories about some of the folks who worked at the establishment. 

Well amazingly enough there's a small section about Mott Hester in this book and it even includes a picture!

Here's the snippet from the book:

Captain W. L. Kennedy was such an ardent fisherman that he purchased a boat, the India, and hired a permanent captain Mot Hester. The Hester family had come from Jamesville, North Carolina, to fish in Carteret County a number of years before.



Images courtesy of the book "Tales of the Atlantic Hotel 1880-1933" 
by Virginia Pou Doughton, page 40.

Mott was not the only Hester mentioned in this book. In fact, Mott's nephew Jim is mentioned on another page. Jim Hester was the son of Mott's sister, Nannie. 

Image courtesy of the book "Tales of the Atlantic Hotel 1880-1933,"
by Virginia Pou Doughton page 47

In fact, Virginia Pou Doughton wrote a book prior to this one titled, "The Atlantic Hotel." This book tells the tale of the hotel when it was in Beaufort, Carteret, NC from it's creation in 1859 until it was destroyed by a storm in 1879. In that book she mentions the heroics of certain individuals on the night of the storm. 

Here's a passage:

The Hester brothers from Morehead City were in Beaufort at the time of the tempest and they helped many guests reach safety.

That family continues to produce descendants of character and decorum as is seen in James Arthur Hester at the Morehead City Yacht Basin and in Alice Hester Walker of the Coral Bay Club.  

The Hester brothers she referred to in this book, I believe may have been Mott Hester's older brothers, Benjamin and John. 

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Something About Me Saturday: When We Were Young

Tom and I --September 1995

     Now don't get me wrong, I know that I am not that old so maybe excuse the title just a bit.  It's just interesting to look at this picture now. It was taken on the back deck of the apartment my then boyfriend, now husband was living at. We were celebrating his 40th birthday. Now, I am the age he was in this picture. It's interesting to be in these shoes now. I realize how much of a baby I was then and I still wonder what on earth was he thinking, picking up this fresh out college girl. This leads me to the story of how we met. 
     My first job out of school was selling advertising for a local radio station.  I was very excited to get the job. I even had my own business cards. (In my mind, having business cards of my own, meant I was grown. Ha!) Anyway one day I walked into a certain shop and guess who I tried to sell air time to?  You guessed it. Tom. He listened intently to my sales pitch and then politely declined. He walked me out of his shop and that's when he said, "You know your station really isn't for me but....Are you seeing anyone?"  
    I had been seeing someone but things had pretty much run their course with that relationship. I ended it and within a couple of weeks, Tom and I went on our first date.


Thursday, April 25, 2013

Morehead City...The Beginning --part two

Image courtesy of North Carolina Civil War Image Portfolio from the UNC Library. 
"Beaufort, Fort Macon and Morehead City, from the balcony of the Macon House, Morehead City." 1862. 
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, April 26, 1862, p. 388.

If you missed part one to this series here's the link:  Morehead City...The Beginning. One piece of information that was mentioned in "Morehead City Centennial Jubilee Book," I want to highlight here again.

Only about one-half of the 600 acres of the Arendell property was surveyed and laid off into streets and building lots in readiness for the first auction sale.  

This section of land ran from the terminus of the railroad at the wharf to 15th street in the city. I will go over a theory I have regarding the family land in an upcoming post and how this last statement plays a role in that.

There's also lots of  information about the founding of the town in another book I own called, "A Pictorial Review of Morehead City: History Through 1981."   The following section picks up with the year 1858.

     Not until the completion of the railroad and the start of its operation on July 7, 1858 did any construction of homes or business places get underway. Within the next two years, building activities were in full swing. Shipments over the new railroad began to arrive from upstate for reshipment by boats to other ports.

One of those first buildings built was a hotel called the Macon House. It was built in 1860.  The hotel was practically brand new when it was taken over by Federal troops just two years later and used for a hospital. Eventually, it was used for officer's quarters.  The image at the beginning of this post was drawn from the balcony of this hotel.


Image from "A Pictorial Review of Morehead City:  History Through 1981 


This next section describes the demographics of the population in Morehead City in 1860.

     Morehead City's first census was taken in 1860 by Durant H. L. Bell, whose title was "United States Assistant Marshall in the County of Carteret."  At that time the population of Beaufort was 1,611 compared to Morehead City's 316.  Beaufort was 139 years old and Morehead City was 3 years old.  There were about 50 buildings in town. 

     Morehead City's free colored people was 4 and the number of slaves 197.


Now when I saw this last sentence, I had a flashback to a conversation I had once with my mother. She was telling me about one of her childhood visits to Morehead City and how whenever her mother introduced her to folks it always seemed to be with a, "Here's cousin such and such..." My mother flat out asked her mother, "Mom, we can't be related to all these people. Can we?" Well, what I know now is that most of the folks my mother met were in fact cousins and if they were not blood related...they were as good as. Families in this neck of the woods all knew each other, like from forever.  So yes, they were cousins.  :)

`
During the Civil War, development came to a standstill and the population slightly declined. Once the war was over, the economy picked up again slowly at first, but then it gained momentum with the building of the Atlantic Hotel in Morehead City in 1880.

My next post will pick up with my family's connection to the Atlantic Hotel. Until next time....




Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Morehead City...The Beginning

Image taken from "Plan of the city of Morehead: at the termination of the Atlantic & North Carolina Rail Road, Beaufort Harbor" Created by Charles L. Ludwig for the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Company. Date depicted circa 1857.  From the North Carolina Maps Digital Collection, hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The last couple of days I have been pouring over books I have in my collection regarding Morehead City, NC.  This town holds a special place in my heart because it was the home place of many of my maternal ancestors. In fact, my roots have ties to this town going back almost to it's beginnings. I will go into further detail about that in an upcoming post. For now, I thought it would be good to share some history about this special place.

John Motley Morehead, who was the 29th governor of North Carolina, had the idea to develop this area, to take full advantage of it's great natural harbor.

The following is an excerpt from a book called "Morehead City Centennial Jubilee Book," that was published in 1957. This section discusses how the town was founded.

     As early as 1852 Mr. Morehead directed his attention to the advantages of the harbor in this section. His investigations resulted in the purchase of 600 acres of land owned by the members of the Arendell family.  He purchased the first 300 acres for the sum of $933.33, paying the sum of $1,200.00 for the other 300 acres.  The purchase of the 600 acres comprise the present site of Morehead City from 24th Street to Newport River.  

     Following the purchase of this property Mr. Morehead organized the Shepard Point Land Company, acting as its first president.  He seems to have taken no active steps to develop his holdings into a city until the railroad was actually under construction in 1855. 
     
     In August 1857, Mr. Morehead began advertising that lots would be sold on November 11th in the new city laid off by the Shepard Point Land Company at the terminus of the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad.  He stated the railroad would pass through the entire length of the city to its wharf at 18 feet of water.

     The law granting the incorporation of the Shepard Point Land Company states in part:  "Be it enacted by the General Assembly... that William H. Arendell and John M. Morehead and such other persons as they may associate with be incorporated by the name and style of the Shepard Point Land Company with a capital not to exceed $500,000.00 That said corporation shall have power and authority to improve their land and property by filling and raising same above high water, to build wharfs, dredge out navigable channels, build hotels houses and make such improvements in said property as they deem proper, and the same to occupy, use and employ, for the benefit of said corporation, to lease, rent, sell, or any manner dispose of as they deem best for the interests of the corporation."


     Only about one-half of the 600 acres of the Arendell property was surveyed and laid off into streets and building lots in readiness for the first auction sale.  This section extended from 15th street to the terminus of the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad at Newport River.  It was not until after the close of the Civil War that the balance of the town site from 15th to 24th streets was gradually improved.

 Image taken from "Plan of the city of Morehead: at the termination of the Atlantic & North Carolina Rail Road, Beaufort Harbor" Created by Charles L. Ludwig for the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Company. Date depicted circa 1857.  From the North Carolina Maps Digital Collection, hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


My eyes are getting tired so I think I am going to call it a night folks. More to come tomorrow.

Friday, April 19, 2013

Some Answers...More Questions

After I celebrated finding out Frank Bryant Jr.'s middle name was Mitchell on my post Amanuensis Monday: The Will of Rosa Mitchell Jones, I reviewed what other information was on the will.

a)Frank Mitchell Bryant received his grandmother's house and land that the home resided on.
 
1400 Fisher St, Morehead City, NC
Frank Sr. and Ophelia Bryant's home.

Lot where 1404 Fisher St once stood.
Part of 1400 Fisher St can be seen on the right.
The house that once stood here was very similar in design to 1400 Fisher St

     My 2nd great grandmother, Rosa Jones, lived at 1404 Fisher St in Morehead City, NC, next door to her daughter Ophelia Bryant.  Frank Jr. was the oldest of Ophelia's seven children, so perhaps it makes sense that he inherited his grandmother's home. According to my mother, Frank always lived with his grandmother and referred to her as "mother." Upon learning this, I questioned why?  Then I thought about the circumstances. Ophelia gave birth to Frank in 1912 when she was she was only 18 years old. Rosa probably stepped in to help her daughter who eventually went on to become a school teacher. Having her grandson to raise probably helped Rosa fill the void left by the death of her husband, Alexander Jones in 1915. I wonder if any of Frank's siblings were jealous of him inheriting his grandmother's home? Another thing I learned from my mother about Frank, was that he attended the funeral for his grandmother but he didn't attend the funeral for Ophelia, who passed away in 1939. Not attending your mother's funeral...now what was that all about?! Hmm.

b) In Rosa Jones's will it states, "I give and bequeath to my daughter, Madeline T Harris, my breast pin, set with rubies."

     In actuality, Madeline Teresa Harris was Rosa's granddaughter. Madeline's mother was Rosa's daughter, Lovie Jones. I don't know a lot about Lovie. I know she was a professional nurse and was married twice. Her first marriage took place on March 24, 1902 in Morehead City to a John M Harris. The marriage was short lived because according to the 1910 census she is listed as being divorced and residing back home with her parents. Her second marriage was to a Thomas D. Watson

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.
   
Was it a mistake that Madeline Harris was referred to as Rosa Jones's daughter in the will? Or was this some indication of the relationship they had? Perhaps Rosa assisted with raising her granddaughter too.

c)According to the will, the remainder of Rosa's real and personal property was to be divided equally between her three daughters Lovey Jones, Mary E. Wooten and Ophelia Bryant or their heirs.
     
   It states "that then my Executor or his successor, shall sell all of this balance and residue of my property, both real and personal, and distribute the same equally between my three daughters or their heirs, after paying any of my debts that may be then unpaid."   The Executor of the will was a W. C. Gorham, an actual lawyer. I have discovered only a few wills for my ancestors but this is the first one that I have come across that someone had a lawyer handle their affairs. 

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Family Tree Magazine 40 Best Genealogy Blogs In 2013



I was so surprised to find my blog listed on Family Tree Magazine's 40 Best Genealogy Blogs list for 2013. I found out when my friend and fellow genealogy blogger Yvette Porter Moore of The Ancestors Have Spoken sent me a message on my Facebook wall. Her message read, "Girl!! Your blog made the Top 40 Genealogy Blogs!!! Congrats to you!!!" I would like to send a huge thank you out to Family Tree Magazine for this recognition and to all my readers for following me on my genealogy journey.

Here's the link to the article at Family Tree Magazine: http://familytreemagazine.com/article/Top-40-Genealogy-Blogs-2013

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Sometimes It's The Little Things That Make Me So Happy


Microsoft Office Downloaded Images

On my last post, Amanuensis Monday: The Will of Rosa Mitchell Jones, I got the biggest kick out of one the little things revealed by the will. I bet many of you can relate to this next topic. I have discovered ancestors with middle initials that I have no idea what they stand for.  You'll go around asking different family members, "Hey, Do you know what such and such's middle name was?" You ask maybe in just a little too excited tone of voice and your family looks at you like, "Okay is that middle initial really all that important?" Well, for me it is. I don't know. I just like to know as much as possible about my ancestors and yes even those teeny weeny little details, I get excited about. 

The relative with the mystery middle initial this time was Frank M. Bryant, the grandson of Rosa Mitchell Jones. Frank was the eldest child to my great grandparents Frank and Ophelia Bryant of Morehead City, NC. No one in the family knew what the M stood for until I found this will. Lo and behold it was Mitchell. Now, I had suspected that it might have been this prior to finding the will, but I had no documentation. So when I came across it with laptop in lap while watching TV with my husband, you probably can guess what happened. Hubby was all enthralled in the program we were watching and here I go yelling "A-HA!  I knew it!" Startled, he looks at me in that manner that says, okay I married a crazy person. Then he kindly asks "What?" That's when I tell him my grand uncle's middle name was Mitchell.

Silly, right? Well not for me. I found this picture today online and I found it fitting to describe how I feel, when I make these little discoveries. How about you? Do any of you celebrate the little discoveries?

Monday, April 15, 2013

Amanuensis Monday: The Will of Rosa Mitchell Jones

Rosa Mitchell Jones
My 2nd great grandmother

Sometimes I feel like a bit of a fraud when it comes to this whole genealogy thing. The reason is that I have been blessed to have access to so much information on-line. My ancestors managed to reside in places where good records were kept and those records have made their way into cyberspace. I shake my head and say to myself, "Why should I be so lucky?" Then I say, it has to be for a reason. These folks want their voices to be heard.  So with that being said, here's another thing I came across recently, the will of Rosa Mitchell Jones.  I wrote about my 2nd great grandmother on other posts. In case you missed those, here are the links.
So our people owned land...
The audacity to own land.,
Fearless Females --Six Word Memoir Tribute

Image courtesy of FamilySearch.org :  North Carolina, Probate Records, 1735-1970
 Carteret Wills, 1925-1948, Vol. G  Image 124

North Carolina,
Carteret County,

     I, Rosa M. Jones, of the aforesaid County and State being of sound mind, but considering the uncertainty of my earthly existence, do make and declare this my last Will and Testament; 

     First:  My executor, hereinafter named, shall give my body a decent burial, suitable to the wishes of my friends and relatives and pay all funeral expenses, together with all my just debts, out of the first moneys which may come into his hand belonging to my estate. 
     Second:  I give and devise to my gran-son Frank Mitchell Bryant, my home place, consisting of the house and two lots upon which the house is situated. But should I survive my said gran-senthen the property to go to all of the children of Ophelia Bryant living at my death, share and share alike. 
     Third:  I give and bequeath to my daughter, Madeline T Harris, my breast pin, set with rubies. 
     Fourth:  My will and desire is that all of the residue of my estate both real and personal, after taking out the devises and legacies above mentioned, if it cannot be agreeably divided  between my three daughters, Lovey Jones, Mary E. Wooten and Ophelia Bryant, equally, share and share alike, to all of the parties concerned,that then my Executor or his successor, shall sell all of this balance and residue of my property, both real and personal, and distribute the same equally between my three daughters or their heirs, after paying any of my debts that may be then unpaid.
     Fifth:  I hereby appoint Mr. W. C. Gorham, my lawful Executor to all intents and purposes, to execute this, my last Will and Testament, according to the true intent and meaning of the same, and every part and claus thereof-hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all other Wills and Testaments by me heretofore made. 


Image courtesy of FamilySearch.org.:  North Carolina, Probate Records, 1735-1970 
Carteret Wills, 1925-1948, Vol. G  Image 125


     In witness whereof, I, the said Rosa M. Jones, do hereunto set my hand and seal this the 14th, day of October, 1926.

                                                             Rosa M. Jones   (SEAL)
     Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Roas Amm Jones, to be her last Will and Testament, in the presence of us, who, at her request and in her presence, and in the presence of each other, do subscribe our names as witnesses thereto.

                                                             Nellie Piner,                   
                                                             Lillie Piner,                    

North Carolina,     ]      ss.          In the Superior Court.
Carteret County,   ]
-----------------------

     A paper writing purporting to be the last Will and Testament of Rosa M. Jones, deceased, is exhibited before me, the undersigned, Clerk of the Superior Court for said County, by W. C. Gorham, the executor therein mentioned, and the due execution thereof by the said Rosa M. Jones, is proven by the oath and examination of Nellie Piner and Lillie Piner, the subscribing witnesses theret, who being duly sworn, doth depose and say, and each for her self, deposeth and saith, that she is a subscribing witness to the paper writing which is now shown as aforesaid, and which bears the date of the 14th, day of October, 1926. 
     And this deponent further saith, that the said Rosa M. Jones the testatrix aforesaid, did, at the time of subscribing her name as aforesaid, declare the said paper writing so subscribed by her and exhibited to be her last Will and Testament, and this deponent did thereupon subscribe her name at the end of said Will as an attesting witness thereto, and at the request and in the presence of the said testatrix. And this deponent further saith, that at the same time when the said testatrix subscribed her name to the said last Will as aforesaid, and at the time of the deponeht's subscribing her name as attesting witness thereto, as aforesaid, the said Rosa M. Jones, was of sound mind and memory of full age to execute a Will, and was not under any restraint, to the knowledge, information or belief of this deponent: 

     And Further these deponents say not. 


     Severally sworn and subscribed, this 2nd, day of November, 1931.
before me, 
           L. W. Hassell,                              Nellie Piner
           Clerk Superior Court.                 Lillie Piner 

North Carolina,  ]     ss. In the Superior Court.
Carteret County,]
---------------------
     It is therefore considered and adjudged by the Court that the said paper writing and every part thereof is the last Will and Testament of Rosa M. Jones, deceased, Let said Will, together with the probate, be recorded and filed. 
     This 2nd, day of November, 1931.

                                                            L. W. Hassell,  
                                                            Clerk Superior Court.

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Something About Me Saturday: My Kindergarten Class Picture

When I look back on my life, I group the events that have taken place in three categories.

A) My years living in Cambria Heights, Queens, NY.
B) My years living on Long Island (specifically, Lake Ronkonkoma)
C) And then my Upstate New York years.

This picture is from category A.

This is a photo of my Kindergarten Class, taken in 1978. I attended St Pascal's Baylon Catholic School in St Albans, NY, until I entered the fifth grade. That's when my family moved to Long Island.  My mother was very happy that both of her children had Mrs. Carroll as their first teacher. I loved her. She was an incredibly sweet lady who knew just how to talk to children. I remember some years after she left teaching that she sold encyclopedias door-to-door. I found it so odd seeing her sitting in my living room one day chatting and catching up with my mother. My little mind just couldn't wrap itself around the concept that she was doing something other than teaching. My mother purchased a set of World Book encyclopedias from her, that were well used even through my high school years. 

I am standing in the absolute middle of the picture. Where on earth did I get that jumpsuit from? :)


Friday, April 12, 2013

The Earrings

Talk about interesting discoveries this week...Woohoo! Here's another one.  I have to say I have been very impressed with the updates to records on FamilySearch.org. If you have North Carolina roots people, get thee to FamilySearch because there is a ton of good information available online. Keep in mind some of these records are indexed and some are not. If you have time and patience though you may be able to uncover some really cool things.

The most recent thing I found was in the North Carolina, Probate Records, 1735--1970 collection under Carteret County Wills for 1925--1948, Vol. G.  It was the probate record and will for my 2nd great grandmother, Jonas Bryant.  Jonas Bryant was the mother of my great grandfather Frank Bryant of Morehead City, NC.  I know very little about my 2nd great grandmother. From information found in census records, I know she worked at one point as a clammer but more often she worked as a maid. Anyway, when I came across this record, I was especially excited. Any little tidbit I can learn about Jonas just makes her more real for me. 


Image courtesy of Familysearch.org:  North Carolina, Probate Records, 1735-1970
 CarteretWills, 1925-1948, Vol. G.

The last paragraph on the page shows my 2nd great grandmother's will. I have to say I teared up upon reading it.
                                                                     Morehead City, N. C. October 6th, 1925.
          My last Will and Testament.
     I Jonas Bryant, Do Give and Bequeath To My Daughter Mamie C. Johnson, My piano, My house, My House and Lot, and all of my Furniture, and Wearing apparel. And to my son Frank L. Bryant (2) Two Feather pillows, and the vacant Lot. And to my Grand Daughter Lauris Melba Bryant my Ear Rings, This the 6th day of October, 1925,
Witness                                                                                              you divide with him bed 
Katherine Bynum                                                                              clothes and every thing
Mollie Tillery                                                                                    he want you loving mother

The will was drawn up on October 6th, 1925. Jonas Bryant died October 18, 1927, just a little more than two years later.  I wonder what she was like. Did her son Frank favor her in regards to looks. Was she kind?  Who was the father of her children? This remains a mystery to me. I hope that the spirits will be kind and one day lead me down the right trail to his identity. We'll see.

I find it so sweet that she left her earrings to my grand aunt Loris Melba Bryant. Loris was born January 2,1918.  She was 9 years old when her grandmother passed away. She would have had the opportunity to know her grandmother.  My aunt passed away in 1987, long before I had an interest in family history. I wish I could go back in time and ask aunt Loris about her grandmother Jonas and perhaps those earrings too.



Monday, April 8, 2013

Amanuensis Monday: Irvin Ellison's Will

Image courtesy of Familysearch.org: North Carolina, County Records, 1833-1970
Beaufort Wills, 1808-1968 Page 2880

Here's a refresher on who Irvin Ellison was. He was my 3rd great grand uncle and he lived in Washington, Beaufort County, NC. His sister Caroline Ellison Bryant was my maternal 3rd great grandmother.

Before I get into Irvin's will, I wanted to give a shout out to Bernice Bennett's Blog Talk Radio show, Research at the National Archives&Beyond. If you missed her show on April 4th, Dower Slaves & Administrative Court Action -J Mark Lowe, CG, click on the link. Bernice Bennett's show runs every Thursday at 9pm and if you have the time and love genealogy, you should definitely tune in. J Mark Lowe was the featured guest this week and he presented tons of great information. One of the things I took away from listening to the show was the importance of reviewing court minutes and county records.  This inspired me to go take a look again on FamilySearch.org. at their North Carolina records. This is when I made my new discovery.


Image courtesy of Familysearch.org:  North Carolina, County Records, 1833-1970
 Beaufort Wills, 1808-1968, Page 2881.

I, Irwin Ellerson of Washington, N.C. County of Beaufort Being of Sound Mind and Memory Do make, Publish and Declare This To Be My Last Will and Testament, To Wit
     First - All my Just Debts and Funeral Expenses Shall Be First Fully Paid
     Second - I Give Devise and Bequeath all The Rest Residue and Remainder of my Estate Both Real and Personal To My Beloved Wife Zilpha Ellerson To Have To Hold Her My Said Wife As Long As She Live after Her Death To Go To My Brother Harvey Ellerson & Sister Caroline Bryant and To Their Heirs and assigns Forever Never To Be Sold
Third - I nominate and appoint my Brother Harvey Ellerson To Be The Excutor of This My Last Will and Testament Hereby Revoking All Former Wills By Me Made
     In Witness Whereof Have Here to Let My Hand and Seal This 8th day of June A.D. 1915
                                                               his 
                                                      Irwin X Ellison          (Seal)
                                                               mark

Signed Sealed Published and Declared as and for His Last Will and Testament By The above named Testator in our Presence Who Have at His Request and in His Presance and in The Presance of Each other Signed our Names as Witnesses Thereto

Elbert G Weston 
J Elmer VanHook


Image courtesy of Familysearch.org.:  North Carolina, County Records, 1833-1970
Beaufort Wills, 1808-1968, Page 2882.


State of North Carolina   ]  SS.  In The Superior Court.
     Beaufort County
      A paper writing purporting to be the last Will and Testament of Irvin Ellison deceased, is exhibited before me, the undersigned, Clerk of the Superior Court for said county, by Harvey Ellison one of the heirs of deceased and the due execution thereof by the said Irvin Ellison is proved by the oath and examination of Elbert G. Weston and J Elmer VanHook, the subscribing witness thereto, who being duly sworn, doth depose and say, and each for himself deposeth and saith, that he is a subscribing witness to the paper writing now shown him, purporting to be the last Will and Testament of Irvin Ellison; that the said Irvin Ellison in the presence of the deponent, subscribe his name at the end of said paper writing, which is shown as aforesaid, and which bears date of the 8th day of June, 1915.
     And This Deponent Further Saith, That the said Irvin Ellison the testator, aforesaid, did, at the time of subscribing his name as aforesaid, declare the said paper writing so subscribed by him and exhibited to be his last Will and Testament, and this deponent did thereupon subscribe his name at the end of said Will, as an attesting witness thereto, and at the request and in the presence of said testator And this deponent further saith that at the same time when the said testator subscribed his name to the said last Will as aforesaid, and at the time of the deponent's subscribing his name as attesting witness thereto, as aforesaid, the said Irvin Ellison was of sound mind and memory, of full age to execute a Will, and was not under any restraint, to the knowledge, information or belief of this deponent:  And further these deponents say not. 

     Severally sworn and subscribed, this 16th]  Elbert G Weston
day of February, 1927, before me.                ]  J Elmer VanHook
     Geo. A. Paul

North Carolina                     ] SS   In the Superior Court,
     Beaufort County.
     It is therefore considered and adjudged by the Court that the said paper writing and every part thereof is the last Will and Testament of Irvin Ellison deceased. Let said Will, together with the probate, be recorded and filed. 
     This 16th day of February, 1927
                                                               Geo. A. Paul
                                                                           Clerk Superior Court

Saturday, April 6, 2013

New! Something About Me Saturday


I think I am going to start a new tradition on Saturdays and write something about me. At some point, I am going to cross over and become one with the ancestors. I need to make sure my kids and future descendants know a little something about Andrea Kelleher. So here goes.

I have dabbled in quite a few things in life. In high school, it was creative writing. I wrote a few short stories and some poems too. A couple of those poems were published in my high school's creative writing and art magazine called Dimensions. Here's two of them. (Warning! These were written when I was seventeen. You may detect a bit of teen angst.)

"A Loss of Innocence" by Andrea Kelleher


"Drowning" by Andrea Kelleher


Wednesday, April 3, 2013

My Husband's 23andMe Results!

So what's in my husband's DNA closet?
Image courtesy of  Idea go/ Free Digital Photos.net


Let's just say his results were a bit more homogeneous. My husband's mother was of English and Irish descent while his father's family was just Irish. I thought perhaps that there was something in there that he didn't know about. Perhaps just a little something, something?

Here are his results:

Image courtesy of 23andMe.

That's right folk, I am married to the whitest man in America! Okay maybe not the whitest. I think that title went to Stephen Colbert when he was featured on Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s Faces of America series. If you missed Stephen Colbert's DNA reveal, here's a link to an episode of him on his own show The Colbert Report with Gates as his guest. I think my husband may be able to give Stephen a run for his money. Ha!

Taking a closer look at his European roots, 23andMe was able to provide a little more detail about his genetic make-up.

Image courtesy of 23andMe.



Image courtesy of 23andMe.


Image courtesy of 23andMe.

So far on my husband's Relative Finder he has 989 potential cousins. I guess we better get to emailing people.

Monday, April 1, 2013

What's In My Husband's DNA Closet?

Last week I revealed the results of my 23andme DNA test. Those test results weren't the only ones my family had been anxiously awaiting for. I bought two tests when the company dropped their prices to $99 --one for me and one for my husband.  His results came back a week after mine. What was lurking in his DNA closet?
Microsoft Office Downloaded Images

To be continued...